Archive for April, 2011

Statistics: On Analysis of Variance (AnoVa – Part Two)

Wrapping up his explanation of the AnoVa, Kyle T. this week presents his third way of understanding the intention of the statistical test by graphically modelling distributions to be compared: By looking at distributions as representations, the comparison becomes clearer than the abstract concepts in consideration.

See you in May!

The Veritas Team

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By admin | Tuesday, April 26th, 2011 | No Comments »

Statistics: On Analysis of Variance (AnoVa – Part One)

This week, as promised, Kyle T. introduces the extension of the t-Test, the Analysis of Variance (AnoVa), meant for comparisons among more than two participant groups. His explanations of the AnoVa tie onto the heart of the test, discerning the variance within groups from the variance between groups; he turns to information theory for its descriptive analogy, educing a signal from noise.

Next week: A brief continuation of explaining the AnoVa, including graphs!

Warmly yours,

The Veritas Team (more…)

By admin | Tuesday, April 19th, 2011 | No Comments »

Statistics: On t-Testing (Part Two)

Continuing last week’s discussion of the t-test, Kyle T. describes the Paired or Dependent Samples t-Test and the ways in which it relates to its already presented sibling, the Independent Samples t-Test. Though this relationship is not sequential as have been the relationships between the other previously presented tests, the two tests nevertheless logically support one another and continue the progression of complexity in statistical analyses that he’s been developing so far.

Next week: AnoVa!

Hoping that you’re enjoying warm weather this Spring,

The Veritas Team

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By admin | Tuesday, April 12th, 2011 | No Comments »

Statistics: On t-Testing (Part One)

Hey, statistics students and aspiring social scientists; it’s t-Test week!

This week Kyle T. presents the basics of the t-test, the most foundational analysis in inferential statistics. Thus, this test and its consequential relatives will be the analyses that you conduct most often in your own research. Exciting!

Happy April,

The Veritas Team

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By admin | Tuesday, April 5th, 2011 | No Comments »
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